Alright y’all, I’m writing this post for semi-selfish reasons haha. We get pitches to be on our podcast, The Online Business Besties, every week now without fail. And I truly LOVE getting pitched for this.

Why? Because it makes my life easier having potential guests come straight to me instead of needing to research and reach out. It also expands the potential pool of people I can have on the show to others who are fabulous, but who I just hadn’t come across online before.

So if you’re thinking of pitching a podcast, do know that the host is legit looking forward to your pitch!

I’ll be honest though, regardless of how much we loved getting pitched for the podcast, most pitches we receive get a no.

“… Wait, what?”

Here’s the thing, I also was clueless before on how to successfully pitch a podcast, but now having received a lot of pitches, I’ve realized that most pitches don’t really help the host say yes to you!

Here’s things from the hosts perspective:

  • They want legit experts on their show that know their stuff because they only want to share the best with their audience

  • They have NO CLUE most time who you are/what you know/what you’re an expert at

  • They’re creating a ton of content and don’t have 8 hours available to figure out what to ask you related to your episode topic

So here’s specifically what we are looking for in podcast pitches and the things that are similar between the pitches we have accepted.

The pitches that have gotten yeses from us all have this in common:

  • They had an exact topic idea (and sometimes even a title for the episode)

  • They broke down the topic to the smaller bits and pieces within that topic they could talk about/questions I could ask

  • They shared their experience on the topic

  • They gave more background info on themselves/how they got into this topic

  • They had a legit looking website

  • They had content related to their topic on their site

  • They either linked us to a place they’ve spoken online or we were easily able to find a place they’ve spoken online

Let me break those down a bit more.

They had an exact topic idea (and sometimes even a title for the episode)

By doing this you’re making it easy for the host to determine, have we had that topic before? Would that topic be useful for my audience? And you’re doing the work for them as they likely don’t know you, so you’re the better person to determine a topic than the host is.

It’s just about impossible as a host to meet someone, have a very vague idea of who they are and what they know and pick a topic for the episode.

They broke down the topic to the smaller bits and pieces within that topic they could talk about/questions I could ask

A topic is just the beginning. A podcast episode is generally an hour long and a host needs to ask you a lot of questions to fill that hour. If your topic is, say, Squarespace web design and I don’t know much about that topic (obv I do , but just for example’s sake), I’m going to struggle to know what to ask you.

So break down within your exact topic what bits and pieces you’d like to cover on your topic. For example:

  • The 4 keys to converting people on your website from browser to buyer

  • The biggest DIY’ed website mistakes most small business owners make

  • What moving from WordPress to Squarespace is like

They shared their experience on the topic

Let’s say you want to talk on the podcast about launching, give me a few bullet points of your experience with launching, for example:

  • How we tweaked our launch process from our 1st to our 10th launch

  • What we did differently to break the 6 figure mark on our 5th launch

  • The 4 mistakes we made during our most recent launch

  • How using Facebook ads increased our sales by 50%

They gave more background info on themselves/how they got into this topic

A show generally starts by asking the guest who they are, what they do and how they got into what they currently do. If you have an interesting story related to this, that’s another thing to potentially talk about that might be of interest to/resonate with the audience.

So share quickly any interesting bits about your story related to your topic/business.

They had a legit looking website

Legit business owners have legit websites. (Except Tim Ferriss . But he’s Tim Ferriss so he can do whatever he wants, haha.)

Podcasters want to share legit business owners on their show, people who actually know what they’re talking about and are experts on their topics. And a legit looking website goes a long way to building credibility.

Your site doesn’t need to be a piece of art on the internet or have been built by an uber expensive developer, but it needs to look legit.

(My Square Secrets course can help you out with this one if you’re struggling with it!)

They had content related to their topic on their site

Even with you giving a podcast host the bullet points of breaking down your topic and sharing your experience on the topic, it still takes a LOT of questions to make up a 1 hour episode. I generally have 1.5-2 pages of questions written for any show with a guest. So I need to research to figure out what to ask beyond what you’ve already provided in your pitch.

The way I do this is to go on your site, check out your blog or podcast or videos and look at what you’ve said on your topic. I then pull out questions from the bits you’ve mentioned in your post.

They either linked us to a place they’ve spoken online or we were easily able to find a place they’ve spoken online

The last thing I want to know before accepting a pitch is to see you speak somewhere. I love having confident, clear, personable, fabulous vibe people on the show.

If I can see you talk somewhere, like on another podcast episode, a YouTube video, a past Facebook live or Instagram TV, then I can check, “yep, this girl can communicate really well!”

If a pitch doesn’t link to somewhere they’ve spoken before, we will go creep your site and socials to try to find something. Granted, with an inbox full of pitches and other emails, we’re not going to spend an hour going into the depths of your blog archives and scroll back to a Facebook live video from 3 years ago. So if you can link something in the pitch itself of you speaking somewhere, that’s super helpful in us giving you a YES!

(It doesn’t matter so much if the content of the speaking was on the topic of your pitch or not. It’s beneficial if it is, but not a make or break.)

Bonus easy ways to get a ‘heck yes!’:

Share commonalities:

If you have something in common with the host (for example, we were in the same program/course together, you also skipped working a 9-5, etc.) then mention it. By doing this you’re showing that you’ve paid attention to what I say in my business enough to know that we have something in common/it’s always just nice to chat with people about common experiences.

Share your course/program success story:

If you’re a past student/client and have been successful after implementing the teachings of a course/program the host has, SEND THAT PITCH ON OVER! Podcast hosts LOVE to show off how their students have been successful after following the advice of their course/program. Testimonials go a long way with potential buyers and you sharing how you were successful after going through the course/program is gold!

At this point we’ve had almost 1,000 students go through our courses, give it a year or two that number will likely be multiple thousands. Unfortunately, program/course creators often don’t know your story in a sea of thousands, but they absolutely want to know it!

So tell them about your success, making your podcast episode topic how you did it, and again, look at the guidelines above to give more info on your topic so the host has more to ask you then just “how did you do it?”

So, I hope that was helpful and know I would absolutely LOVE to receive your pitch that makes it easy for me to say yes! You can send us an email to hello @ paigebrunton . com to pitch being on the Online Business Besties podcast!

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